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Opinions and observations from environmental experts, activists, and luminaries

I support your efforts to find solutions to problems and issues that affect our Dharma. Unfortunately we do not have the support, cooperation and resources as the Abrahamic religions and as such we are easy target for officials and non-hindus so we have to work harder to gain recognition. Remember other religions want to "harvest hindus" and they use any and every opportunity to convince our people that their's is a better, logical, reasonable and wealthy religion. Our People, lacking in knowledge and led by poorly qualified priests have a double handicapp. We have to lift ourselves up by our selves as the Bhagawad Gita Suggest.

Now, about the environment, The Authorities have tha right to preserve wild life. The creatures are accustomed to eat sea food and we disposing of our prasadam cause the to fail to thrive, breed and die. We must act in accord with nature.

Got to dash..... More later Thanks

To the author, I respect the fact that you have posted this message, taking pride of who you are and what your faith is. I agree that our religion is perceived as being one "that permits deleterious ecological practices". Looking at the beaches/environment from other people’s perspectives and stepping away from being a person of the Hindu faith, I can see why people of other practices may view the message that we are trying to send out differently. I honestly believe that when god wants us to worship him/her with all of our hearts, it doesn’t necessarily mean to leave all of our items at the shore of the beach, or even deep out into the ocean. After offering our prasadam and other items, we should offer it to the people in need, because for all that we may know god can be posing as those individuals trying to test our faiths. After observing what occurs at the beach, I have noticed that the prasadam and other items come back to the shore, which is a message in itself; we should offer these goods to people directly, as opposed to having it go through the water, trash, people stepping all over it, etc.

As of now, all we can do is move on. At this point we will have to try our best to send the message out to EVERYONE of this faith notifying them of the conflicts. By notifying them, I don’t only mean telling them, I mean letting them truly understand how their actions are harming Mother Nature, although it may be out of devotion. Lastly, I understand that our religion hasn’t gained the full respect of the people who follow other practices, but I do believe that one of our priorities should be to try and gain their respect by working towards making the environment cleaner.

Interesting article. I happened to help in the cleanup of the Rockaway Beach one Saturday morning and was very astonished to see the mess. The children found new murtis, new diyas, etc. - items that people could easily take home and reuse. I know our scriptures recommended Ganga puja, but I don't think it mentioned anywhere in any of the scriptures about leaving the offerings on the shore. All of the items used in the olden days were biodegradable. For example, Lord Rama made the Lingam out of mud and offered flowers. In Guyana when the people used to make their offerings, there was another set of people awaiting to collect them. They would take the coconut home and make coconut oil or simply cook with it. When people completed their puja in their home, they would clean up. Similarly, people should clean up after themselves when they finish their puja on the beach. I know it's simply to say but difficult to implement. Pandits need to start addressing this issue in the mandirs. A few mandirs are aware of it, and they are working with the Parks Department to help in the cleanup.

On the flip side of this. Are you aware of the mess the fishermen makes right there at the Rockaway Beach? I sometimes goes there for evening stroll and would take a walk up on the bridge and would be so disgusted with the stench and mess up there - plastic bags, cups, plates, beer bottles, soda cans, fish heads, fish guts,etc. Don't tell me that some of these things don't get toss into the water and come up ashore? What is the Parks doing about this? They were there cleaning it up that Saturday. The fishermen are still there everyday.

I am not trying to shift blame here, but if we are going to address the issue then it should be well rounded. Keeping the beach clean should not involve only one group of people. This should be a community effort. Everyone should be made aware of how they are helping to pollute the environment.

I have gathered hundreds of volunteers for over 4 hours each during the season to catch up to an keep up with the amount of debris left behind each season by families who are practicing this very calm nice ritual of worship.
The families themselves are very nice, the debris is not at all boring for the student volunteers to pick up. I do my best to educate the students as to the symbolic meaning behind the offerings. They say if they are symbolic thaen why can't the worshippers pick them up and throw them away instead of us?
I have no answer for them except that it is a form of superstition. A sort of feeling of bad luck if they remove what they symbolically gave to the god.
They students say it may be an excuse for laziness or plain selfishness on their part to use our park in an illegal way and then walk away.

What do you tell them????? It is illegal, it is disgusting to see after the water has washed the cloth aroiund the rocks and the sand burys it partially for years as it turns ugly colors and moves in a scary way under the shallow water.

read my long comment on the 1489
article....

or check out www.ferrypointpark.org for mucho photos and opinions on this subject that we have tried to embrace for years now....

Thank you all for the comments and contributions! I do appreciate your feedback.

It is ok to worship the Godess Ganga for the right things. For example, Lewis Pancham and his girl friend Sabit Hewick and also his Son In Law at the Kali Temple in Queens are doing religious practices on the beach for the worng reasons. They are offering rum, cigers, chicken, pigs and goats the Godess Ganger on the beach at midnights on Fridays to take away women husband and put them to supports the women that Lewis Pancham and his Son in Law sleeps with. Pandit Chunelall Lewis Panchan and his Son in Law have Kali Temples in Queens and they are changing wives like they change there clothing. They are puting spells on inocent women and sleeping with them. Lewis Panchan is a 65 yerars so called Kali Priest who have a 2 years old baby girl. He refused to take care of his child. He broke the home of an innocent couple and put his Trinidad Girlfriend and his daughter with someone else husband. Pancham said whether he like it or not that Trinidad Guy have to support his baby. How unfair. Therefore, Pandit Chunelall I really do not think that you should encourage worship at the beach. If you do religous practices they too will go to there wicked practice to hurt innocent people. This wicked people is getting out of control they need to stop. Do you know Lewis Pancham was in Jail in Trinidad and his wicked son in law Davendranath Sukhu sponsor him into the United States in June 1996. He is banned from Trinidad for his wickedness. Now they are doing it here in New York bold and fear none.

Hi, is this the Sanita that goes to Guru Daveo's Church on Linden?
You can also find our information on FACEBOOK Dorothea Poggi I am now a Vice President of the Bronx Council for Environmental Quality We will be working on the waterways of the East Bronx in the future. Check out www.ferrypointpark.org Events and Hindu Bottons to see the effort involved in the cleanups... We thank all those who are adapting their worship to cleaner, healthier Water Ways throughout the world. We also commend you on following your religious beliefs as well.....