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Business & Politics

Oregon officials are doing whatever they can to keep the details of crude-by-rail shipments secret from the public—and that includes not asking railroads about them.
Since the first Earth Day in 1970, the United States has been warming at nearly twice the rate of the global average.
In this week’s “Years of Living Dangerously,” Arnold Schwarzenegger fights fire in the Wild West and Harrison Ford flirts with deportation.
A Nebraska court ruling and outpouring of public comments forces the State Department to extend its consideration of the tar sands pipeline.
When life hands you backyard chickens (yep, it's a trend), you make a lot of omelettes. But I'll skip on the roasted hen for now.
For most of the world's population, climate change means nothing but trouble. For a few, it means laughing all the way to the bank.
A middle schooler says he can save the government millions in printing costs and reduce ink-based waste with a simple font switch. Could it be that easy?
Forget Joffrey's big day. What happened on last night's 'Years of Living Dangerously?' We recap Showtime’s celeb-studded climate doc as only TV obsessives can.
The folks at Isidore Recycling are very good at taking things apart. But they’re even better at putting broken things back together again.
More good news for Alaska’s Bristol Bay as mining giant Rio Tinto withdraws from a proposed mega-mine.
Can an IPCC report or a star-studded Showtime mini-series change the way people talk and think about climate change? Katharine Hayhoe urges her fellow climate scientists to ramp up their messaging game.
New rules expected to eliminate giant mounds of polluting dust might actually make the problem worse. Time for a rewrite.
A massive scientific report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says global warming will affect every continent, every ocean, and every one of us.
This week’s (thankfully small) crude oil spill into Chicago’s drinking water source scares lawmakers into demanding better prevention plans.
The family farm creates a deep attachment to the land. But it can also lead to a guilty conscience.
Making sure the Clean Water Act covers small streams and headwaters would protect the drinking water of millions of Americans.